+509 34 34 3416 / +509 40 62 9873 (406-AZURE) /+509 42 02 9873(420-AZURE)

Admission Requirements


















Program Length Semester Hours: Quarter Hours: 197.5
General Education Hours (See Minimum Requirements Below): 56
*Minimum General Education Component: 56
Degree Semester Quarter
OAD/AAS 9 14
AA 36 54
AS 15 22.5
BA 45 67.5
BS 30 45


(The duration of a Bachelor Degree Program shall be a minimum of 120 semester credit hours, 180-quarter credit hours, or the recognized clock hour equivalent. A student transferring into the institution with an Associate Degree totaling 60-credit hours, will combine these Associate credit hours with the Bachelor credit hours to meet the minimum total stated above.)

ENTRANCE/ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS: (Programs of four hundred fifty (450) or more clock hours or the credit hour equivalent shall administer a basic skills examination to each student who enrolls, unless the student has provided evidence of a high school graduation diploma, general equivalency diploma, or its equivalent.)
Must be 18 years of age Admissions Interview Prospective students who wish to enter our programs must schedule and attend an admissions interview with an Azure College Admission Representative. During this interview, an admissions representative evaluates an applicant’s history, career goals and potential for academic success. This interview also provides applicants with the opportunity to determine whether the programs of study meet their individual objectives. Complete the College Enrollment application and pay the $50 application fee Proof of High School Graduation or Equivalence Prospective student must provide one of the following: Verification of high school graduation (transcript, diploma, etc.) OR Verification of GED completion (GED scores or GED diploma) OR Proof of graduation from a foreign institution comparable to a United States secondary school or Verification (official transcript) of an earned degree from an accredited institution recognized by United States Department of Education, or An evaluation of an official transcript by a NACES approved educational evaluator service attesting that the degree is equivalent to a degree earned at an accredited institution of higher education in the United States. Additional Admissions Requirements Student must provide the following before an admission decision is made: GPA of 2.0 or “C” or higher for all general education and nursing concentration (core) courses required within the degree plan. Ability to meet the Clinical Requirements policy. Recommendation from the Nursing Admissions Committee. Provide to the School a clean Level 2 criminal background check. Provide to the School a clean Drug and Alcohol Test A score that meets or exceeds the national average for the TEAS entrance exam
Student must provide the following at the most 30 days after class start. Complete Physical Exam Complete an American Heart Association CPR course. Provide a current Liability Insurance
PROGRAM OBJECTIVE:
Azure College’s Bachelor of Science Degree program in Nursing enables students to acquire the knowledge and skills required to become registered nurses (RN) SOC Code 29.1111. Registered nurses are vital members of the health care team who assess, plan, and provide direct patient care. They work closely with physicians and other health care professionals.
Education in nursing combines class work with clinical experiences in local hospitals, health care agencies, and the community. In addition to nursing classes and clinical assignments, students take a series of general education and basic science courses.
Within the scope of practice for the registered nurse, the graduate will meet the client’s needs by: Using critical thinking, the nursing process, and current standards of practice in developing plans of care based on developmental, biological, physiological, socio-cultural, religious and spiritual, and teaching/learning needs of clients. Practicing within the 3 nursing roles of provider of care, manager of care, and member of the discipline of nursing. Performing basic and complex therapeutic interventions using nursing knowledge, advanced skills, and current technology in a competent and safe manner. Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing-professional behavior Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing-communication Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing-assessment Demonstrate competencies in the core components of the professional nurse-clinical decision making Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing-caring intervention Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing- teaching and learning Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing-collaboration Demonstrate competencies in the core components of professional nursing-managing care In meeting these outcomes, graduates of the program will not only be educated in a broad scope of nursing practices “to respond to society’s health care needs,” but also to fill a need realized from the national nursing shortage. The rigorous curriculum will ensure the highest level of training and quality of candidates.
PROGRAM DESCRIPTION:
The content includes, but is not limited to, theoretical instruction and clinical experience in medical, Psychiatric, surgical, obstetric, pediatric, and geriatric nursing; theoretical instruction and clinical experience in acute, care, long term care and community settings; theoretical instruction and clinical application of professional role and function; personal, family and community health concepts; nutrition; human growth and development over the life span; body structure and function; interpersonal relationship skills, mental health concepts; pharmacology and administration of medications; legal aspects of practice; and current issues in nursing.
Clinical experience is received in hospitals on acute medical-surgical, obstetrical, pediatric, maternity and critical care units, emergency rooms and operating rooms; in extended care and rehabilitation facilities; with home health and community health agencies; and in psychiatric facilities.
Upon completion the program, the graduate will receive an Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing and be certified to the FBON who will determine the student’s eligibility to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX© -RN).
Course Number Course Title Theory Clock Hours Clock Hours Lab Clock Hours Clinical Simulation Clinical Clock Hours Quarter Credit
General Education
COM 100 Introduction Computers 45 0 0 0 4.5
ENG 101 English Composition 45 0 0 0 4.5
MAT 100 College Algebra 45 0 0 0 4.5
HUC 101 Introduction to Communications 45 0 0 0 4.5
HUM 101 American Government 45 0 0 0 4.5
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology 45 0 0 0 4.5
BEH 101 Introduction to Sociology 45 0 0 0 4.5
HUM 101 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 45 20 0 0 5.5
MIC 100 Microbiology I 45 0 0 0 4.5
ENG 102 Developmental Writing 45 0 0 0 4.5
HUM 102 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 45 20 0 0 5.5
NUR 170 Life Span Development 45 0 0 0 4.5
General Education Courses Total: 540 0 0 0 56







Core Requirement Courses (Support)




NUR 300 Fundamentals of Nursing 60 60 30 90 13
NUR 310 Nursing Pharmacology 45 20 0 0 5.5
NUR 320 Medical Surgical Nursing I 60 20 30 120 12
NUR 330 Maternity Nursing Care 45 20 15 60 8
NUR 340 Medical Surgical Nursing II 60 30 30 120 12
NUR 350 Pediatric Nursing 35 30 15 60 7.5
NUR 360 Nursing Leadership and Management I 45 20 0 30 6.5






NUR 370 Cultural Issues of Nursing 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 380 Gerontology 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 390 Health Assessment 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 400 Health Care Delivery Systems 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 410 Health Promotion 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 420 Health Promotion 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 430 Nursing Leadership and Management II 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 440 Pathophysiology 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 450 Population-based Nursing 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 460 College Algebra 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR 470 Introduction to Communications 60 0 0 0 6.0
NUR480 American Government 80 0 0 0 8
NUR490 Introduction to Psychology 30 0 0 0 3
CORE NURSING TOTAL HOURS 1660 240 120 480 197.5


Total Quarter Credits: 197.5

Total Clock Hours: 2,500

145 weeks, Average Clock Hours/week: 17

10 Lecture Hours = 1 quarter credit hour

20 Lab Hours = 1 quarter credit hour

30 Clinical Hours = 1 quarter credit hour

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE
INVENTORY OF EQUIPMENT:
Quantity Equipment Item Brief Description Of Equipment
5 Anatomical charts
5 Anatomical model, cell
5 Anatomical model, heart
5 Anatomical model, kidney
5 Anatomical model, lungs
5 Anatomical model, reproductive organs
5 Anatomical model, skin
5 Aprons, plastic
5 Aquathermia pad
2 Arm boards
1 AV equipment
1 AV materials
1 Bags, isolation
1 Bags, isolation biohazard
1 Basin, shampoo
1 Basins, emesis
1 Basins, wash
1 Bath basins
1 Bath blankets
1 Bath towels
1 Bed cradle
1 Bed, hospital with siderails
3 Bed pans, fracture
3 Bed pans, regular
3 Bedside stands
10 Bedspreads
1 Binders, abdominal
1 Binders, breast
1 Binders, Double T
1 Binders, T
1 Board for transferring total body
1 Cabinet, supply
5 Canes
1 Carafes
1 Cart, linen
5 Catheter, external male
3 Catheter drainage set-ups, various types
3 Catheter supplies (non-consumable)
1 Cbi
1 Chair, shower
1 Chairs
1 Chart holders
2 Chest tube supplies (non-consumable)
2 Colostomy supplies
2 Commode, bedside
26 Computer printer
26 Computer software
26 Computer system
14 Computer table
1 Crib, child’s
2 Crutches, adjustable
1 Decubitus ulcer supplies (non-consumable)
5 Dentures
5 Dressing supplies
5 Enemas supplies (non-consumable)
5 Eye/ear irrigation supplies (non-consumable)
5 Eyewear, protective
1 Flow sheets, charting samples, care plans
1 Foley setup & supplies
1 Footboard
1 Footstools
5 Gauze roller
5 Geri-chair
5 Gloves
5 Gloves, isolation
5 Gooseneck lamp
5 Gowns, isolation
5 Gowns, patient
5 Graduate measures
5 Hair and nail-care supplies (non-consumable)
5 Hampers with bags
5 Hand towels
5 Intake & output supplies (non-consumable)
5 Isolation equipment
5 Isolation supplies
3 IV equipment & supplies (non-consumable)
3 IV stands
1 Lifter (mechanical and/or Hoyer)
25 Linens, bed
2 Irrigation setups & supplies
1 Manikins, CPR
1 Manikins, variety
30 Masks, isolation
3 Mattresses
1 Medication cart
1 Mitt, ankle
1 Mitt, wrist
1 N/G tubes
5 Oral-care supplies (non-consumable)
5 Pads
5 Perineal supplies (non-consumable)
10 Pillow cases
3 Pillows
3 Privacy curtains or screens
2 Protectors, elbow
2 Protectors, heel
2 Restraints, vest
2 Restraints, wrist
2 Resuscitation training model
2 Scale, balanced
2 Scale, with height measure
5 Shampoo board
5 Sharps container
5 Shaving supplies (non-consumable)
5 Sheets
5 Sitz bath, portable
1 Skeleton
1 Specimen containers, sputum
1 Specimen containers, stool
1 Specimen containers, urine
1 Specimen containers, various types
3 Sphygmomanometers
3 Stethoscopes, regular
5 Stethoscopes, teaching
5 Stockings, anti-embolic
2 tubes, oxygen

WhatsApp WhatsApp us

Introduction to Computer Applications is designed to familiarize students with computers and their applications. It will also emphasize the use of computers and technology throughout their high school, college, and future careers. Students will learn fundamental concepts of computer hardware and software and become familiar with a variety of computer applications, including wordprocessing, spreadsheets, databases, and multimedia presentations. Students will also investigate Internet-based applications, working with email and learning how to browse the web. Coursework also includes activities that explore social and ethical issues related to computers.

In English Composition, students learn how to develop better writing skills by identifying and understanding the steps involved in the writing process-all in this one online English course. The English composition course examines five fundamental types of writing: compare and contrast, argumentative, persuasive, narrative, and descriptive. Lessons in this English course also highlight the importance of proper grammar, punctuation, and spelling, and explain effective research techniques, editing, and revision.

This course includes the study of quadratic equations; rational exponents and their properties; radicals; rational expressions and equations; factoring (review); graphing linear and quadratic functions and interpreting graphs; solving systems of linear equations and inequalities; and applications.

This course introduces students to the theories and principles of speech communication from a wide range of perspectives. The evolution of communication theory is examined and foundational principles, such as the communication process, perception, verbal and nonverbal communication, and listening, are introduced. These principles are then applied to communication in interpersonal, small group, public, and organizational contexts. The dynamics of relationships, intercultural and gender communication issues, and conflict and negotiation are also explored, along with ethical issues inherent in the communication process. Discussions of current viewpoints related to interviewing, mass media, and new technologies present a contemporary view of the communication process.

American Government begins with the evolution of the social contract, U.S. political ideals and the 4 theories of power in America. Next comes the Constitution: how it was created, what it says, checks and balances and the importance of the Bill of Rights. You’ll explore Federalism and the balance between federal and state governments. Once you understand where our government comes from, you’ll move on to how it interacts with citizens: civil liberties, civil rights, public opinion and mass media, special interest groups, and the electoral process. You’ll examine the 3 branches of the federal government in depth: Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary, before ending with public policy and State and Local governments.

This course introduces nursing concepts related to psychiatric/mental health. The unique needs of clients with mental-health issues are explored. Building on the foundation of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, the student will examine client responses to stressors across the life span. Tasks of biological-behavioral concepts in psychiatric nursing care, and cultural impacts will be addressed.

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies

This course provides a comprehensive look at the human body’s structure and functions. Topics include organization of the body, characteristics of life, anatomical terminology, how the body maintains homeostasis, the relationship of chemistry to anatomy and physiology, and cell function and division. The skin, skeletal system, muscles, and nervous system are examined. Sensory organs and the endocrine system are also presented. Several diseases and disorders are discussed, and as well as the cause, detection, and treatment of them. Students will also perform and complete content complementary at home labs with accompanying assessments as a lab component to this course.

This course is designed to teach microbiology as it applies to the health care field. We will study pathogenic microorganisms and their role in human disease, human immunology, symptoms and treatment of microbial infection, and preventative measures against microbial infection.

Developmental Writing examines the fundamental process, theories, and methods that enhance a student's overall writing ability, and introduces strategies for writing within multiple disciplines and professions. You will draft and revise sentences, paragraphs, and essays, with the aim of achieving effective college-level writing skills. You will learn how to improve sentence structure and clarity using grammar, punctuation, and word choice. The course introduces proper research techniques, and various writing genres, including narration, as well as exploring the concepts of cause and effect, compare and contrast, definition, and argumentation.

Building on Anatomy and Physiology I, this course examines major parts of the body and how they work independently as well as together. The reproductive system is discussed as well as stages of human development. Students learn about the lymphatic system and the three lines of defense the body has against pathogens. Also explained are the cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and urinary systems as well as nutrition, metabolism, body fluid balances, and aging.

This course focuses on lifespan and human development. It explores the life of a human being from the moment of conception throughout their lifespan as they grow up to be infants, toddlers, adolescents, adults and older adults.

This course aims to give a strong foundation on the fundamentals of nutrition to the nursing students. The course focuses on the nutrition, healthcare promotion, maintenance, facilitate the healing process of a client or patient in a health care facility setting.

Upon successful completion of this course, the student should be able to:

nursing on of pharmacology

This course begins the nursing student's education on the concepts of Pharmacotherapeutics, establishing a knowledge base that applies to patient care and education. At the completion of this course the student will understand the major drug classifications, through the use of prototypes and understand the five concepts of human functioning emphasizing Pathophysiology structured on the steps of the Nursing process.

Introduction to the safe, patient-centered care of adult medical-surgical patients. An emphasis is placed on the utilization of the nursing process and evidence based practice when caring for patients with common problems that have predictable outcomes in a variety of health care settings.

Obstetrical nursing considers the child-bearing family’s level of wellness when self-care limitations imposed by pregnancy and childbirth engage individuals in change. The critical thinking models for human functioning, initial nursing interventions, the detailed nursing process and developmental assessments will be used to provide comprehensive, holistic nursing care to the woman and her developing family.  During pregnancy, childbirth and post-partum, common normal stressors and selected high risk challenges that create therapeutic self-care demand(s) which require partnering will be considered. Child nursing care focus on the other hand considers the stressors that affect an individual child’s level of wellness by imposing transitional or permanent self-care physical, social, developmental and/or emotional limitations. The critical thinking models for human functioning, initial nursing interventions, the detailed nursing process and developmental assessments will be used to explore nursing care for children and their families. Clinical experiences provide opportunities for students to integrate concepts from the classroom into the nursing care of children and their families. The focus is the implementation of the holistic nursing process, with accompanying technical skill sets, for children with common occurring health limitations.

This course focuses on adults experiencing medically complex alterations in health and highly technical skills required by today’s nurse for care of an individual’s body-mind-spirit. Critical thinking models for human functioning and initial nursing interventions will be used and practiced in conjunction with the nursing process. Medical/surgical nursing care concepts are revisited in the context of concepts of critical care nursing. Selected stressors include, but are not limited to, those causing an altered state of wellness that requires complex adjustments to self-care and a resulting difference in one’s state of wellness. Lab experiences focus on developing and demonstrating competency in technical skills and integrating skills into complex client care scenarios.

This course provides a family centered approach to the nursing care of pediatric clients and their families. Students will learn the nurse's role in meeting the short and long term needs of the pediatric client, family, and community through preventative, therapeutic and palliative care, with recognition for the multicultural aspects of client needs.

This course examines the assimilation of professional nursing leadership roles with emphasis on the integration of theories of organizational development and culture, beginning leadership and management skills, such as delegation and priority setting, into the practice of nursing. Professional issues are explored to provide a foundation for independent practice by assisting the student to prepare for employment as a registered nurse. Laboratory and clinical experiences provide the students with opportunities to demonstrate the attainment of expected clinical and educational skills and competencies.

This course focuses on culture and its impact on health care delivery at the individual, community, and system levels. This course is designed to raise awareness, to inspire action, and to open discussion of cultural issues affecting professional nursing practice.

Credit Hour Designation: 6.0    Total Course Hours: 60   Total Student Preparation Hours: 120

This course provides a foundation for nursing practice with older adults across the spectrum of health, illness, and care settings. The more subtle presentation of disease and the importance of functional and geriatric-specific assessment tools as well as an interdisciplinary approach to care is thoroughly discussed. There is an emphasis in this course on early recognition of the geriatric syndromes, preventing a downward spiral of disability, and facilitating function and quality of life for the older adult. ANA Gerontological Standards of Care, Institute of Medicine (IOM), and QSEN recommendations for improvements in quality and safety provide the framework for this course. Nurses successfully completing this course will be able to incorporate Best Practices for managing pain, falls, delirium, dementia, malnutrition, incontinence, and polypharmacy when caring for older adults.

Credit Hour Designation: 6.0    Total Course Hours: 60   Total Student Preparation Hours: 120

This course provides the RN-BSN student with the opportunity to build on knowledge and skills of performing and documenting a comprehensive health assessment of diverse individuals across the life span. Critical analysis and synthesis of assessment findings will be emphasized to aid in clinical judgment and decision making for patient care.

This course provides perspectives on health care delivery past, present, and future. It also addresses the impact of health care issues on health care delivery including the determinants of health to include insurance costs, applications for health professions, and the need of comprehensive planning and its impact on the future. This course will encourage the formulation and evaluation of potential solutions to some of the most urgent health care delivery issues facing the U.S. today.

This course explores the concepts of health promotion and the application of health promotion concepts to nursing practice to enable the client to control and improve health outcomes. While focusing on the methodology critical to developing a plan of care for clients, students will learn the rationale and techniques for utilizing specific assessment tools, analysis of assessment data, selection of life span appropriate interventions, implementation of interventions, and measurement of resulting outcomes. Content will be focused on cultural diversity, disparity in health care and social determinants that impact the client’s plan of care and resulting approaches for promoting a healthier society. The use of technology and health promotion research will be explored and applied to nursing practice.

This course explores the concepts of health promotion and the application of health promotion concepts to nursing practice to enable the client to control and improve health outcomes. While focusing on the methodology critical to developing a plan of care for clients, students will learn the rationale and techniques for utilizing specific assessment tools, analysis of assessment data, selection of life span appropriate interventions, implementation of interventions, and measurement of resulting outcomes. Content will be focused on cultural diversity, disparity in health care and social determinants that impact the client’s plan of care and resulting approaches for promoting a healthier society. The use of technology and health promotion research will be explored and applied to nursing practice.

This course provides the graduate student with the opportunity to apply the concepts learned in prerequisite courses to Nursing.  The content focuses on human resource management, evidence-based practice, managing interdisciplinary teams, collaborative decision making and communication in healthcare and legal issues of management in a healthcare environment. Through mutual agreement, the student and course instructor choose an area of concentration and clinical practice site appropriate for meeting course and student goals.

This course provides a study of variations in physiologic functioning and alterations in physiologic response of body systems. The course addresses physiologic changes that will help identify alterations in body systems and their relationship to the patient's state of health. Topics include altered cell functioning, genetic disorders, risk factors, health promotion, and disease prevention.

This course addresses contemporary community health Nursing issues, focusing on key concepts of wellness, prevention and chronic case management while caring for culturally diverse populations. This course includes a clinical experience in a community health setting supervised by program faculty and onsite preceptors. Students design these experiences in consultation with faculty mentors and preceptors. Students must choose clinical placements which are different from their current workplace environment, responsibilities and supervision. All clinical placements are evaluated and approved by faculty for curriculum “fit” prior to start of clinical experience. The course emphasizes theory and practice of community health Nursing, while integrating principles of epidemiology. Students learn to assess the community as client for a population-focused practice of Nursing. Course activities include assessments of individuals, families and groups to identify health needs and health disparities including bioterrorism and emergency preparedness.

This course includes the study of quadratic equations; rational exponents and their properties; radicals; rational expressions and equations; factoring (review); graphing linear and quadratic functions and interpreting graphs; solving systems of linear equations and inequalities; and applications.

This course introduces students to the theories and principles of speech communication from a wide range of perspectives. The evolution of communication theory is examined and foundational principles, such as the communication process, perception, verbal and nonverbal communication, and listening, are introduced. These principles are then applied to communication in interpersonal, small group, public, and organizational contexts. The dynamics of relationships, intercultural and gender communication issues, and conflict and negotiation are also explored, along with ethical issues inherent in the communication process. Discussions of current viewpoints related to interviewing, mass media, and new technologies present a contemporary view of the communication process.

American Government begins with the evolution of the social contract, U.S. political ideals and the 4 theories of power in America. Next comes the Constitution: how it was created, what it says, checks and balances and the importance of the Bill of Rights. You’ll explore Federalism and the balance between federal and state governments. Once you understand where our government comes from, you’ll move on to how it interacts with citizens: civil liberties, civil rights, public opinion and mass media, special interest groups, and the electoral process. You’ll examine the 3 branches of the federal government in depth: Legislative, Executive, and Judiciary, before ending with public policy and State and Local governments.

This course introduces nursing concepts related to psychiatric/mental health. The unique needs of clients with mental-health issues are explored. Building on the foundation of previous nursing courses and the nursing process, the student will examine client responses to stressors across the life span. Tasks of biological-behavioral concepts in psychiatric nursing care, and cultural impacts will be addressed.